Alcoholics Anonymous Overview support-groups

How Alcoholics Anonymous Started


Many people that were alcoholics were able to get over the condition through the help of the groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. The two came up with what is known as the 12 Steps to guide the meetings which later gave birth to the "12 traditions" that set out the reason for the AA's existence. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What To Expect From AA

Arriving at the decision to go to an AA meeting can be scary and very uncomfortable, especially for people who don't realise what to expect from it. This is to be expected because the meetings involve telling people whom you've probably never met that you're an addict and that you need assistance. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. Everybody in the AA programs even those running them has gone through the program at some point, so they empathize with members.


You can always expect a warm welcome when you attend the sessions. They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. AA has the understanding that a number of people cannot be comfortable with sharing their intimate details during the initial visits to the organisation. As time passes by most attendees become comfortable with the great healing and therapy, they receive through the open and honest discussions which are provided by these meetings.


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Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. You have the option of deciding whether you want to attend a closed meeting or an open meeting depending on your comfort level within the organisation. This is mainly because some people do not want to involve their families and friends in their struggle with alcoholism and the recovery process. There those who need family and friends to be there when they attend the meetings.


The 12 Steps Of AA

The 12 steps were first started in Alcoholics Anonymous but is used in addiction recovery groups for many other drugs nowadays. Though steps are taught to one leading to the next (linear), the members experience them as a circle of events. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

The first step includes admitting that you have a problem, and really need help to solve it. Subsequently, the steps include making decisions to quit, accepting yourselves and others the wrongs which may have been committed, making amends for the wrongdoings along with making a commitment to improve continually. Learn more about the twelve steps here.


AA Resistance

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are

  • They doubt that attending the meeting will help
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They do not accept they have a problem

Knowing the main objective of attending the meeting will help you overcome some of these excuses and recover from your addiction.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


AA Groups Near You

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. The meetings held many times so you can catch the next one soon. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. If you're looking for an AA group, we can assist you to find one just contact 0800 246 1509.