Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

In the UK, Talk to Frank has been operating the anti-drugs campaign for a long time on its own. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. The idea was to build a reliable "older brother" image that could provide advice to teenagers about banned substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


Frank was ground-breaking and criticised by Conservative politicians at the time because they felt it suggest that there were some good things to go along with all the bad about drugs.


One primary online promotion educated viewers: "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, the goal of the ad was to be upfront with young people about the effects of drugs so that Frank could establish some accountability.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

Yet, similar to each other anti-drugs media battle on the planet, there is no proof Frank has ceased individuals consuming drugs.

Substance use in the United Kingdom has decreased by 9% in the ten years since the campaign was introduced, though the pros say a lot of this is because of a decline in the use of cannabis use, probably connected to younger people's changing attitudes towards smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs:

  • A website
  • A private phone number that is available round-the-clock
  • Email
  • A classified live chat facility, accessible from 2pm-6pm everyday
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment